The Dark Side of Humanity: The Work of Robert Hertz and its Legacy


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Robert Hertz was a student of Emile Durkheim and Marcel Mauss who died in battle in World War I, but whose work has had a continuing influence in the anthropology of religion. Hertz belonged to the Annde Sociologique, the group of scholars gathered together by Durkheim which published a journal of the same name. The author of The Dark Side of Humanity, Oxford-trained anthropologist Robert Parkin, who is known for his work on the Munda of Central India, is among the translators who have in recent years made Hertz more directly available in the English-speaking world. Evans-Pritchard was lecturing on Hertz at Oxford in the s, but it was not until that Rodney and Claudia Needham translated his articles on death and the right hand published as Death and the Right Hand with an introduction by Evans-Pritchard in English.

Needham also provided an article on Hertz for the International Encyclopedia of the Social Sciences. Cambridge University Press. Harwood Academic Publishers. Namespaces Article Talk. Views Read Edit View history. A course instructed by Wellesley's Neelima Shukla-Bhatt is part of a new series designed to teach about the history and social impact of world religions through their scriptures.

Melissa Harris-Perry delivered the keynote at Wellesley's Commencement in Professor Elena Tajima Creef moderated a February discussion at the MFA after the museum's programming led to outcry over racial stereotypes. Paula A. Johnson, announced yesterday as Wellesley's 14th president, spoke with students Shivani Kuckreja '16 and Charlotte Harris '16 at her home last week. Speaking with The Pre-Med Years podcast, Adele Wolfson discussed why students should find a balance between social sciences and humanities and science.

Professor Katharine H. Moon has been interviewed by NPR and has authored commentary for The Brookings Institute, following the recent news that North Korea had tested a nuclear weapon. Eunice Han, visiting lecturer in economics, wrote an amicus brief explaining how the Supreme Court case Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association could affect unions and public-sector employees nationwide. Panel discussions brought students and alumnae together for conversations about the Wellesley Effect. Nine panel discussions are included among the videos now available on the College's YouTube channel.

The event allowed them to explore larger format printing. Professor Rosanna Hertz and student researchers are studying how donor-assisted conception is shaping the meaning of family and kinship for millions of people. Take a spin through campus and enjoy a sample of our multitalented faculty at work—through the lens of a liberal arts winter.

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Robert Hertz

A recent celebration brought faculty together to share successful blended learning projects and discuss the expansion of the physical limits of the classroom thanks to digital technologies. On the occasion of her retirement, the community gathers to celebrate Bunny Harvey, Elizabeth Christy Kopf Professor of Art, and her accomplishments as an educator and artist, in 40 years at Wellesley.

Syndicated columnist uses Wellesley professor Angela Bahns' research in nationally published column that shows how pre-existing prejudice makes us fear others. Some Wellesley faculty members draw inspiration for their creative work from their children or their own childhoods. Leila Elabbady '16 and Zena Chantila '16, both neuroscience majors, spent a recent morning presenting to middle school students on Egyptian and Lebanese culture, and that afternoon dissecting sheep brains with fifth graders.

Dan Brabander, professor of geosciences, and students worked with a community group to study lead levels in fruit harvested in urban settings around Boston. Their results have surprising practical health applications.

Frank Wilczek: "A Beautiful Question" - Talks at Google

A collection of interviews conducted by students will be featured in an exhibit called Stories from the Forgotten War: Korean War Oral History. A day of marches, panels, and gatherings on campus brought the campus community together to confront and address issues from racism to global terrorism. Amidst a growing need for financial literacy for teens, research by Kartini Shastry, assistant professor of economics, and colleagues suggests more math could be the solution.

Museums must embrace diversity if they are to survive and thrive, according to Peggy Levitt, chair and professor of sociology.

The Dark Side of Humanity

Her work was recently praised by a respected New York Times art critic. For many members of the Wellesley faculty, creative pursuits outside of the classroom provide personal and professional enrichment. An interdisciplinary environmental studies course combines online learning and cross-campus collaboration between students at Wellesley and Davidson colleges.

A new website offers a single digital space where visitors can explore and learn about the humanities at Wellesley.

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The Advisory Committee on Environmental Sustainability has launched a draft of its Sustainability Plan, which aims to impact nearly every aspect of campus life. The History Department hosted a panel discussion on September 30 to consider how the legacy of World War II still impacts various nations. A new study co-authored by Wellesley's Jeremy Wilmer shows that opinions about beauty may be shaped by past social interactions just as much or more than by our genes. Professor Tracy Gleason, who studies the imaginative play of children, spoke with the New York Times Magazine about the toy.

Students in GEOS are exploring sedimentation rates in Paramecium Pond and the Silver Thread as part of a semester-long project using these sites as living laboratories. Adele Wolfson penned an essay for Inside Higher Education warning against shifting too far away from science training for future doctors.

The Dark Side of Humanity: The Work of Robert Hertz and its Legacy - CRC Press Book

This fall, the Davis presents a feature exhibition that showcases the prolific works of acclaimed Wellesley art professor Bunny Harvey. The Davis reopens tonight for the fall season. Researchers working in the lab of neuroscience professor Marc J. Tetel have published a paper that presents novel findings on how progesterone affects the brain. A discovery in a South African cave adds a new branch to the human family tree. Now in its second year, Online Italian course appeals to a variety of different learning styles and a wide audience. Wellesley offers more than a thousand courses and 52 majors.

Here's a snapshot of five Humanities courses offered this fall that students are invited to Explore.


  1. Senhora (Ilustrado) (Literatura Língua Portuguesa) (Portuguese Edition)!
  2. Twisted Tales.
  3. Quest For Love!
  4. Email Newsletters.
  5. When Bluebirds Fly: Losing a Child, Living with Hope.
  6. Book Reviews;

Each semester the College invites highly esteemed professional artists, performers, writers, and speakers to campus. Wellesley is embarking on a focused effort to spread the word about the crucial role the Humanities play in a liberal arts education.

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Rubinstein '15, argue that an understanding of microbiology could change the way doctors diagnose and treat diseases. The Science Center recently hosted a poster presentation, which displayed student work conducted during the College's Summer Research Program. Wellesley's Kathryn Lynch penned an op-ed in the Washington Post exploring the unintended consequences of cuts to humanities programs.

New research, coauthored by Wellesley College economist Phillip B. His new book offers the first study to consider obesity and climate change side-by-side, as parallel policy failures in America. In Physics Einstein and the Dark Universe , first-year students explore the astrophysical evidence that reveals the presence of dark matter and dark energy. Class of Associate Professor of Neuroscience Marc Tetel has published an article in the flagship journal of the Endocrine Society, Endocrinology , about working at a liberal arts college as a career option for research scientists.

Black and blue, or gold and white? Students take funny women seriously in a new Theatre studies course examining the role played by comedic pioneers in shaping American culture over the last century. Robert Goree, assistant professor of East Asian languages and cultures, served as a guest judge on the Japanese gameshow Sushi Time when it came to film in Boston this fall. Professor Alice T. Toklas and Gertrude Stein constructed a public image that challenged accepted gender roles.

Professors from many disciplines study and teach film in the course of their work at Wellesley. A new humanities initiative brings three courses into conversation with each other. From classical studies to French literature and European history, professors Brook, Bilis, and Grote will bring their classes together for performances, readings, and discussions about the transformative power of the theater.

In , Wellesley experts shared knowledge, research, and viewpoints on numerous happenings around the globe. They were sought by news outlets as well as the community, and covered a range of topics. Wellesley's beloved neuroscience instructor Carol Ann Paul was posthumously awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award from Faculty for Undergraduate Neuroscience, an international organization focused on neuroscience education and research at the undergraduate level.

It can be easy to be cynical about the current state of the economy, but former Fed economist Professor of Economics Dan Sichel says there are reasons to be optimistic. Professor of Political Science Marion Just teaches the new Calderwood Seminar on Public Writing, POL1 Campaigns and Elections , using the election as a laboratory to investigate why campaigns are important and what elections mean for democratic governance in the United States.

The Dark Side of Humanity: The Work of Robert Hertz and its Legacy The Dark Side of Humanity: The Work of Robert Hertz and its Legacy
The Dark Side of Humanity: The Work of Robert Hertz and its Legacy The Dark Side of Humanity: The Work of Robert Hertz and its Legacy
The Dark Side of Humanity: The Work of Robert Hertz and its Legacy The Dark Side of Humanity: The Work of Robert Hertz and its Legacy
The Dark Side of Humanity: The Work of Robert Hertz and its Legacy The Dark Side of Humanity: The Work of Robert Hertz and its Legacy
The Dark Side of Humanity: The Work of Robert Hertz and its Legacy The Dark Side of Humanity: The Work of Robert Hertz and its Legacy
The Dark Side of Humanity: The Work of Robert Hertz and its Legacy The Dark Side of Humanity: The Work of Robert Hertz and its Legacy
The Dark Side of Humanity: The Work of Robert Hertz and its Legacy The Dark Side of Humanity: The Work of Robert Hertz and its Legacy
The Dark Side of Humanity: The Work of Robert Hertz and its Legacy The Dark Side of Humanity: The Work of Robert Hertz and its Legacy
The Dark Side of Humanity: The Work of Robert Hertz and its Legacy

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