Excellence in Music Ministry: An Inward Foundation For An Outward Expression


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Matt Maher

History, poetry, and philosophy which included natural science are celebrated as important to individual growth and to civic service. In a 23 November letter to Charles Diodati, Milton indicated the progress of his study, particularly in the field of classical and medieval history, involving the Greeks, Italians, Franks, and Germans. At this time, moreover, Milton kept two important records of his reading and writing.

Also in the manuscript are sketchy plans and brief outlines of dramas, some of which were eventually transformed and assimilated to Paradise Lost. The entries include direct quotations or summaries, with sources cited, so that one learns not simply what books Milton read but also what editions he used.

The composer of the music was Lawes, also the music tutor of the Egerton children. The three children—Alice fifteen , John eleven , and Thomas nine —enacted the parts of the Lady, the elder brother, and the younger brother. Lawes himself was the Attendant Spirit, named Thyrsis. Other characters include Comus, a tempter, by whose name the masque has been more commonly known, at least since the eighteenth century, and Sabrina, a nymph of the Severn River. Because the earl of Bridgewater had taken up his viceregal position without his family having accompanied him, a reunion was planned.

To honor the earl of Bridgewater and to use the occasion of family reunion so that his children could act, sing, and dance under his approving eye are other purposes of the masque. Nor were trained dancers and singers transported from London. These elements of spectacle are incorporated into a plot severely limited by the circumstances of the celebration and by the fact that only six notable players, three of them children of the earl of Bridgewater, participated.

The theme evolves against the three major settings and by reference to the character of the Lady. Typically, Milton uses classical analogues to cast light on the situation. The Lady is likened to the goddess of chastity, Diana, who frowned at suggestions of lasciviousness and whose role as huntress made her a formidable adversary, one whose virtue was militant, not passive.

The Lady is also likened to Minerva, the goddess of wisdom, on whose shield is pictured one of the Gorgons, whose look would turn one to stone. The classical analogues of the enchanter are best explained by his parentage, Bacchus and Circe. In fact, the journey of Ulysses and the temptations encountered by him and his men provide a context in which to understand the travel of the Lady through adversity, her endeavor to withstand temptation, and the reunion that she anticipates.

Degradation or sublimation, respective inclinations toward vice or virtue, are the opposite impulses adumbrated in the masque. With his charming rod in the one hand and the glass containing the drink in the other, Comus is indeed akin to his mother, Circe. Like her, he has attracted a rout of followers, whose antimasque revelry, both in song and dance, suggests a Bacchanal, the sensualistic frenzy associated with his father. Milton therefore suggests that chastity and charity are interrelated. In the Renaissance, particularly between and , the works of Plato were reinterpreted and the central ideas emphasized.

Beginning in Italy at the Platonic Academy of Florence, Renaissance Neoplatonism eventually spread throughout the Continent and entered the intellectual climate of England. The Renaissance version of Platonism synthesized the ideas of Plato and Plotinus with elements of ancient mysticism, all of which were assimilated, in turn, to Christianity.

While on earth, the soul is immersed in the darkness of the human condition and imprisoned in the human body. When the appetites are denied virtue prevails, and the soul is enriched. When, on the other hand, the appetites of the flesh are indulged, vice predominates, and the soul suffers. The foregoing paradigm is typical of certain Renaissance paintings of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. Several works of Perugino and Andrea Mantegna, having been influenced by Neoplatonic philosophy, depict the contention between ratio and libido , or reason and desire.

These paintings show classical gods and goddesses whose allegorical significance was established. Venus and Cupid embody desire and its attendant vices; Diana and Minerva, to whom the Lady of Comus is likened, signify reason and its accompanying virtues. If right reason, or recta ratio , enables one to see the light of virtue, then the Lady has a rational and imaginative vision of the Platonic ideals of faith, hope, and chastity, for which she is the earthly embodiment.

But when reason is misled by the appetites, it is no longer effective. Upstart appetites gain control of a person in whom the legitimate predominance of reason has been subverted. Such a person in whom right reason no longer functions is enslaved by vice. Renaissance faculty psychology is also involved because it highlights the interaction of sensory perception, the appetites or passions, reason, and the will.

His private exposition of Christian theology, De Doctrina Christiana The Christian Doctrine , which was discovered in the nineteenth century and published in , includes a section in which he defines and classifies virtues and vices, then cites scriptural passages, called proof-texts, to substantiate his views.


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De Doctrina Christiana may also be used to distinguish the two kinds of temptation at work in Comus: evil and good. Seemingly minor details, including references to birds, fit into the overall design. A bird thus trapped signifies a foolish person enslaved to his or her passions. Flight also connotes her sublimated and rarefied ascent from the human condition.

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Other verbal images are auditory but at times may involve actual music. A rose is to be admired, and the Lady likewise is to be appreciated. Comus strives to engender a sense of urgency in the Lady so that she will respond affirmatively and immediately to his overture. In De Doctrina Christiana Milton comments that natural virtue is elevated to supernatural status only with an infusion of grace from above. Such, indeed, may be the case with the Lady, whose heroism is rewarded by divine approval and whose joyous reunion with her father at the end of the masque anticipates the relationship of the sanctified soul and the Lord in the heavenly hereafter.

In line with this view, Comus , a theatrical presentation in the Marches or border region between England and Wales, may advance the Lady as an exemplar of the virtue and moral rectitude, not to mention civility, that the lord president seeks to establish in his jurisdiction. As the seat of both the council and the court of the Marches, Ludlow Castle was the central location from which administrative and judicial policy and decisions were issued. Though each poem presents the archetypal conflict somewhat differently, long expositions and debates, or certainly meditations, are crucial in all the works, especially the later ones.

King, like Milton , was a poet who intended to enter the ministry. Justa refers to justments or the due ceremonies and rites for the dead. By writing a pastoral elegy that is heavily allegorical, Milton taps into an inveterate tradition of lament, one that dates back at least to the third century B. As the literary tradition of the pastoral elegy unfolded, certain conventions were established, creating a sense of artificiality that amuses or antagonizes, rather than edifies, some readers, including Samuel Johnson in the eighteenth century.

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Some of the major conventions include the lament by a shepherd for the death of a fellow shepherd, the invocation of the muse, a procession of mourners, flower symbolism, satire against certain abuses or corruptions in society and its institutions, a statement of belief in immortality, and the attribution of human emotions to Nature, which, in effect, also mourns the loss of the shepherd. Because of their friendship Milton , through the narrator, expresses an urgency, if not compulsion, to memorialize his friend.

As a simple shepherd, he will fashion a garland of foliage and flowers to be placed at the site of burial. Allegorically, the garland signifies the flowers of rhetoric woven together into a pastoral elegy. The allegorical significance relates to the daunting challenge of crafting a pastoral elegy. The three kinds of foliage cited by the narrator—laurels, myrtles, and ivy—are evergreens, which symbolically affirm life after death. At the same time they are associated with different mythological divinities. The laurel crown of poetry was awarded by Apollo; the love of Venus was reflected in the myrtle; and Bacchus wore a garland of ivy.

Signified thereby is the poetry written at Cambridge by King and Milton in imitation of classical Greek and Latin literature. But King, who died before he fulfilled his potential as a poet and priest, no doubt reminds Milton of his own mortality.

From this vantage point, Milton should have alluded to the Fates—Clotho, Lachesis, and Atropos—who spin the thread of life. For Milton, King was the ideal clergyman, whose pastoral ministry would have been exemplary. Against the clergy and most notably the bishops, Milton issues a virtual diatribe, a poetic counterpart of his enraged denunciation of them in the antiprelatical or antiepiscopal tracts.

As the principal Apostle, Saint Peter is perceived, in effect, as the first bishop. Later they are equated with infectious diseases tainting the flock. His message, in sum, is that corrupt clergy and bishops may thrive in the present life, but justice will be exacted in the hereafter. At first sorrowful and depressed, he projects his mood onto the landscape.

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Like the resurrected Christ, Lycidas is finally triumphant and glorified. At the end of the poem most of the biblical allusions that celebrate joy after sorrow are from Revelation. In Paradise Lost , for example, the downfall of Adam and Eve and the introduction of sin and death into the human condition are interpreted from a providential perspective. In Samson Agonistes , the downfall of the protagonist results in bitterness toward God.

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Samson, having been chosen by God to liberate the Israelites from the tyranny of the Philistines, is himself enslaved. Despite his vocal opposition to Roman Catholicism, while he was abroad Milton fraternized with numerous Catholics, including Lucas Holstenius, the Vatican librarian; presumably Cardinal Francesco Barberini; and Giovanni Battista Manso, the patron of both Giambattista Marini and Tasso.

Milton did not compose an Arthuriad, probably because his concept of heroism was very different by the time that he wrote Paradise Lost. In Italy, moreover, Milton viewed numerous works of art that depicted biblical episodes central to his later works— Paradise Lost, Samson Agonistes , and Paradise Regained. The relationship of the works of art to the visual imagery in the major poems is the subject of much critical commentary.

During his stay in Florence, Milton visited the aged and blind Galileo. Having suffered through the Inquisition, Galileo was under virtual house arrest in his later years. As a victim of persecution, Galileo became for Milton a symbol of the adversity that a spokesperson of the truth underwent. Also in Florence, Milton read his Italian poetry at the academies, where he elicited the plaudits of the humanists for his command of their language. Milton corresponded with his Florentine friends, such as Carlo Dati, after his return to England. Years later, Milton continued to remember his friends at the Florentine academies with intense affection.

Before his departure from Italy he shipped home numerous books, including musical compositions by Claudio Monteverdi. From Venice, Milton headed to Geneva. He also became embroiled in the controversies against the Church of England and the growing absolutism of Charles I. The freedom of conscience and civil liberty that he advocated in his prose tracts were pursued at a personal level in the divorce tracts. Milton married three times; none of the relationships ended in divorce.

His first wife, Mary Powell, left Milton shortly after their marriage in summer in order to return to her parents. This separation evidently motivated the composition of The Doctrine and Discipline of Divorce By they were reunited. Mary died in His second wife, Katherine Woodcock, whom he married on 12 November , died in In addition to his marital woes Milton faced the deaths of his infant son, John, in and of an infant daughter in Further adversity resulted from his failing eyesight and total blindness by In accordance with epic conventions, he begins his work in medias res.

An overview of major characters and their involvement in the action are the prerequisites to further critical analysis. In the first two books the aftermath of the War in Heaven is viewed, with Satan and his defeated legions of angels having been cast down into Hell, a place of incarceration where they are tormented by a tumultuous lake of liquid fire. By the end of the first book they have been revived by Satan, under whose leadership they regroup in order to pursue their war against God either by force or guile.

Excellence in Music Ministry: An Inward Foundation For An Outward Expression Excellence in Music Ministry: An Inward Foundation For An Outward Expression
Excellence in Music Ministry: An Inward Foundation For An Outward Expression Excellence in Music Ministry: An Inward Foundation For An Outward Expression
Excellence in Music Ministry: An Inward Foundation For An Outward Expression Excellence in Music Ministry: An Inward Foundation For An Outward Expression
Excellence in Music Ministry: An Inward Foundation For An Outward Expression Excellence in Music Ministry: An Inward Foundation For An Outward Expression
Excellence in Music Ministry: An Inward Foundation For An Outward Expression Excellence in Music Ministry: An Inward Foundation For An Outward Expression
Excellence in Music Ministry: An Inward Foundation For An Outward Expression Excellence in Music Ministry: An Inward Foundation For An Outward Expression
Excellence in Music Ministry: An Inward Foundation For An Outward Expression Excellence in Music Ministry: An Inward Foundation For An Outward Expression
Excellence in Music Ministry: An Inward Foundation For An Outward Expression Excellence in Music Ministry: An Inward Foundation For An Outward Expression
Excellence in Music Ministry: An Inward Foundation For An Outward Expression Excellence in Music Ministry: An Inward Foundation For An Outward Expression

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